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Posts Tagged ‘otherworld’

Well, since the blog didn’t end up getting deleted, which I now know was because the “confirm” email was sent to an alternate email address I’ve not checked in eons — and since the blog has been left mostly unattended, I decided I’d spend a bit of time and energy getting her back in shape today.

Based on viewer/friend feedback, I have separated the Daily Dose categories.  The Daily Dose category now only holds posts with the full daily correspondences, as opposed to duplicating each tarot card and fairy oracle.  I’ve created individual categories for the Tarot Card of the Day and the Fairy Oracle of the day, and have also added two new features – Animal Medicine Cards, and Tao cards.

Because my “faerie tales” articles were buried beneath months of Fairy Oracle daily draws, and because I intend to write about more than just faeries, I have re-named that category, calling it Otherworldly Enchantments, and have moved the articles here, separating them from the Fairy Oracle card posts.

In going through my archives, I noticed that when I began the Daily Dose posts, I often titled the posts, “Daily Dose: Today’s Tarot” and included the date, but did NOT include the title of the card.  The same was true with the Fairy Oracles.  So, I’ve gone back and edited the titles of all of the posts in the Tarot Card and Fairy Oracle categories so that the title reflects the card drawn.  This makes it easier for seeking out specific cards, and in tracking patterns or repeat cards.

I’ve revised, retitled, and moved the “About” page.  It’s now called the “Welcome” page. This includes a brief introduction and a full tour of Autumn Sunrise: The Road Home. 

I’ve removed the animal totems from the bottom of the sidebar.  While they served a purpose for me, they were confusing to others and took up un-necessary space.  I’ve still got a full post on my personal totems and what they mean tucked within the Know Thyself and Animagick categories.

I’ve added a “Divination” category to house my writings on tarot, runes, palmistry, numerology, and other divination subjects.  The content in this category is limited as of yet, but I intend on adding to it in the near future.

It felt good to give the blog a little love today.  Now, having had a long nap and a big bowl of macaroni and cheese, it’s time for me to finish my traffic school course.

Life is good.

W

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Written by:
Wendi Friend

When we think of Faeries, most of us conjure images of thumb-sized, glittery beings with flitting wings and secret enchantments. We envision them as sitting on mushrooms, hitching rides on dragonflies, petting unicorns, or kissing sleeping babes. But the truth of the matter is that not all Faeries fit our description of “beautiful”, and we may cast them out of our consciousness simply due to fear. This is a sad truth since some outwardly so-called ugly Fey Folk can be some of the most benevolent and kind creatures. Furthermore, not everything that goes bump in the night is ghost or goblin. On the contrary, some nocturnal beings of Faeryland can do much to protect us against such unwanted paranormal invasions. Welcome to the not so beautiful world of Brownies.

Brownies are said to have originated in Scotland, but are also known in Canada, the United States, and elsewhere – likely stowing away with Scottish immigrants. Aside from being known as Brownies, these enchanted beings have also been known as Little Man, and many English people call them Hobs. Russians know them as Domovi; in Denmark they are Nis. North Africans have named them Yumboes, and in China they’re known as Chao Phum Phi.

Some think Brownies may be associated with the Roman household spirit, the Lar Familiaris, who is said to be an ancestral spirit. Another theory exists that Brownies are the souls of deceased servants, or otherwise connected with the spirit realm. Then again, since the term “Brownie” was first introduced where the Teutons settled, some believe Brownies to be Teutonic in origin.

Unlike our typical depiction of tiny Faeries, Brownies average about three feet in height, give or take an inch or two. Having often been described as ugly, Brownies are said to have eyes as black as coal, pin-sized nostril holes instead of noses (or huge noses and no mouths!), slightly pointed ears, flat faces, wrinkled skin, shaggy hair, hairy bodies, and have unusually long, lanky fingers. As for clothing, Brownies either wear rags, disheveled suits of brown, blue, or green – and sometimes wear cloaks or hats. However, not all Brownies sport the traditional wardrobe; some of these critters are more “natural” and prefer no clothing at all!

Female Brownies are almost never seen by humans, so the only description obtained for these Dwarf Faeries is of the males. Based on this description, it’s no wonder most humans would have a fearful reaction to seeing a Brownie in their home. Perhaps it’s for this reason that Brownies most often choose to hide from humans, sometimes by magickal means of invisibility. In most cases, though, this scenario proves the cliché, “you cannot judge a book by its cover”, as most Brownies are kind-hearted, helpful, protective beings who truly love the people they choose to serve. These Faeries crave human company, and they’re willing to earn their place in a human household.

Brownies are Earth Faeries who “adopt” human families to care for. They will scout an area, remaining in hiding, until they’ve found a family they feel is worthy, most likely one that doesn’t own a cat! Once a family has been chosen, the Brownie will either move directly into the family home, or establish residence in a nearby tree or abandoned building. On the occasions that Brownies choose to live in the home of their chosen family, they’re most likely to set up camp in the attic, cellar, basement, or in a nearby barn or shed. Brownies will then assist their chosen family with domestic tasks and chores around the house or farm, including protecting the family against unwanted guests of a paranormal nature. Some Brownies become so attached to their chosen family that they’ll remain with that family for generations – and while most adults either can’t or won’t see a Brownie, children can! Brownies love to spend time with children, telling them stories or teaching them games to play. They’ve also been reported to alert the family members to potential dangers or forewarn of death.

One thing to keep in mind when dealing with the Faerie Folk, however, is that while many attributes can be associated with most, they cannot be applied to all. As with any species, there is diversity. The Faerie Realm is divided into various sects, cultures, customs, and mannerisms – much the way the human realm is. We can identify our species, in general, as being human, but we can then be divided by geographic location, race, gender, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and a multitude of other sub-categories. And, even though we can describe a large portion of the human species as “intelligent” or “compassionate”, there are always those who stray from the mainstream and do things we find difficult to understand, such as committing crimes. The Faerie Realm operates under similar principles – and while we can describe most Brownies as helpful, kind, benevolent beings, there will always be the rogue character or two who stray from the mainstream. It is always wise to use caution when dealing with otherworldly creatures.

An interesting note about Brownies is that due to their kind-hearted nature, they do not like people who lie, cheat, steal, or who are otherwise dishonest. They also have displayed a strong dislike for the clergy, most likely due to the fact that clergymen often tend to group anything paranormal under the heading of “evil” or as being “of the devil”, and harshly judge the Brownies with little or no understanding of what they actually are or where they come from.

Brownies are cousins to the Leprechauns and share the Leprechauns’ interest in shoe-making. One of the differences between them, though, is that Leprechauns will only make one shoe at a time whereas Brownies will make a pair.

Brownies, as with all Faerie Folk, are extremely sensitive beings. We must remember, too, that these entities do not operate according to the same code of ethics, morals, manners, and beliefs that many of us have been taught. Where we’re taught that it’s polite to acknowledge a good deed, if not openly thank the do-gooder, Brownies consider that to be an outright insult! Not to worry, though – there is a way we can still mind our own manners without offending paranormal house guests! To offer thanks to a Brownie for their assistance around the home and land, simply leave out a small portion of cream or milk, a bit of honey cake, and make sure the area is kept warm and tidy (Brownies love fireplaces!). But remember, they don’t like direct acknowledgement, so such offerings must be cleverly made by “accident”.

One way to rid the home of Brownies, should one so desire, is to intentionally offer the Brownie an item of clothing. They interpret this as the greatest form of insult and will leave. Fans of the popular Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling may recognize this as a familiar characteristic of Dobie, the House Elf introduced in book two, The Chamber of Secrets. In fact, the word “Dobie” is used to describe a specific type of Brownie, one less intelligent and more clumsy than the rest. The Dobie always means well and has a pure heart, but more often than not, ends up making more of a mess than anything else! However, attempting to rid your home of a Brownie should be done with great caution; they are extremely sensitive creatures and may take offense, and an offended Brownie can be capable of many un-pleasantries! Some accounts even suggest that Brownies, if truly offended, can become malevolent and turn into Boggarts, an entirely different and much less pleasant creature of the Faerie Realm.

Many magickal beings have special connections with certain animals, often referred to as “familiars”. In the case of Brownies, roosters are the familiars. Humans often assume that a rooster crowing signifies time to wake up, but in Faerie logic, or at least in terms of Brownies, the rooster’s crow indicates time for sleep. Because Brownies are nocturnal beings, it has been said that they cannot survive in daylight, much like modern tales of vampires. While this may be true with certain varieties of Brownies, it does not apply to the whole; they simply prefer being active at night and sleeping during the day. This could be, in part, due to the fact that there’s less chance of being in close contact with humans at night. Other legends suggest that Brownies have the ability to shape-shift into roosters during the day, much like vampires are thought to turn into bats.

Brownies, when welcomed and treated respectfully, can be blessings to the human home – blessings that can last for generations. They are wonderful caretakers, loving beings, and they take great pride in their work, their homes, and their adopted families. For those humans who can open their minds to the possibilities, close out fear of the unknown, and who are willing to enter into a paranormal partnership, befriending Brownies could prove to be a magickal experience.

Do you believe?

Sources:

Title: A Witch’s Guide to Faery Folk
Author: Edain McCoy
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
Pub. Date: March 1994
ISBN-13: 9780875427331
384pp

Title: Enchantment of the Faerie Realm
Author: Ted Andrews
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
Pub. Date: April 1993
ISBN-13: 9780875420028
240pp

Title: Good Faeries, Bad Faeries
Author: Brian Froud
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: October 1998
ISBN-13: 9780684847818
192pp

Title: The Ancient Art of Faery Magick
Author: D.J. Conway
Publisher: Crossing Press, Inc., The
Pub. Date: September 2005
ISBN-13: 9781580911573
226pp

Title: The Great Encyclopedia of Faeries
Author: Pierre Dubois
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: April 2000
ISBN-13: 9780684869575
184pp

Title: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Faeries
Author: Anna Franklin
Publisher: Paper Tiger
Pub. Date: June 2005
ISBN-13: 9781843402404
288pp

Title: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Author: J.K. Rowling
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: January 1999
ISBN-13: 9780439064866
341pp

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Written by:
Wendi Friend

Gnomes, with their jubilant faces, bushy beards, and pointed red hats, are no strangers to modern human culture. Through home and garden decor (most notably as the Lawn Gnome); video, card, and board games; popularized cartoons for kids – and even by becoming mainstream advertising icons, Gnomes have been integrated into our lives and are recognized around the globe.

The Danish and Norwegians know them as the Nisse; Swedes call them Nissen. In Brittany they’re recognized as Nains. Gnomes are known in Iceland as Soddenskmaend, and in Finland they’ve been named Tontti. Germans know them as Erdmanleins, except in the alpine areas where Gnomes are called Heinzemannchens. Western Russians know the Gnomes as Domovi Djedoes, which means “Earth Faeries”; in Switzerland and Luxembourg the “little men” are Kleinmannken. To the Polish they are Gnom, in Bulgaria and Albania Gnomes are called the Djube. The Dutch have named them Kabouter; Belgians call them Skritek. In Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, Gnomes are known as Mano. A creature of many names, the Gnome has paved its way into the collective consciousness of the human race, but is far from being just a figment of anyone’s imagination.

In the United States, these Earth-dwelling Elemental Faeries are known as Gnomes, although the origin of the word is open to speculation. The word Gnome may have come from the Greek verb gnosis, which translated means “to know”. Then again, it maybe an offshoot of ge-nomes, meaning “Earth-dwellers”. Another consideration for the origin of the word is gnomon, the pointer on a sundial – “knower of time”. Because Gnomes are Earth Elementals, extremely wise, and gifted with the ability to see into the future, any of these word origins would be fitting.

Though the concept of Earth Faeries has existed for ages, it was a 16th century alchemist, Paracelsus, who introduced us to Gnomes as we know them today. Referring to them as pygmies or gnomus, he described these Elemental beings as having the ability to move through Earth as fish move through water. As Earth Elementals, the primary function of Gnomes is to nurture and protect the planet’s physical properties, such as rocks, crystals, minerals, trees, flowers, and all physical bodies of Earth, including animals and humans.

Gnomes are of the Faerie Realm, but being Elementals places them among the higher ranks in Faeryland. Not only are Gnomes set apart from other Faeries by their Elemental status and heightened magickal powers, they also differ in that they do not have wings and they do not fly. Contrary to what some may think, Gnomes are not eternal beings. They age much like humans do, albeit more slowly. They can also be harmed or killed by fire. Gnomes generally live up to a thousand years, maturing around the age of a hundred.

While most Gnomes are depicted as males with white beards, there are female Gnomes, as well as Gnome children. Similar to tradition of the Jewish and Amish, it is the married male Gnome who grows a beard, while married females keep their hair covered. Most adult Gnomes grow to be anywhere between four and twelve inches tall. As a family unit, Gnomes prefer to live together at the base of oak trees, nestling in the deep, intricate root systems – although they can also inhabit rock clusters, bushes, and other domains well guarded by nature. Regardless of where Gnomes choose to establish their homes, structures that will inevitably be constructed with several exits, they will also reserve additional nooks and crannies in nature where they’ll spend ample time, or use as hidden places for extra storage.

Assiduous workers and meticulous craftsmen, Gnomes weave their clothing – most often from the hair of animals, making clever use of sheep’s wool caught on bushes – and have also been known to recycle certain plants for clothing. The women, whether married or single, prefer skirts with aprons. Although the base of their clothing is almost always blue or green, males and females alike enjoy donning vibrant, multi-colored rainbow stockings as well as the familiar cone-shaped cap of red.

Weaving and woodworking are the Gnomes’ favorite domestic tasks, but they are also adept at harvesting crops and occasionally brewing ale. They’re often recognized as being beneficial to the human home garden as care takers or guardians – and as Earth Elementals, much of their energy is applied to creating and maintaining the planet’s physical properties. Gnomes are also musically talented, excelling in playing the fiddle. In addition, Gnomes love to dance – and since that is how they raise their energy and magickal powers, they dance well for both pleasure and purpose. However, the Gnomes’ most prominent magickal attribute is their inherent ability to heal. Gnomes use their charms, enchantments, and earthy wisdom to heal plants, animals, and even human beings on occasion.

Gnomes, by nature, are compassionate creatures who extend their friendliness and courtesies to all life forms. Their only known enemies are Martens, some owls, and humans who set out to harm them or their homes. It has been said that Gnomes have been responsible for damaging equipment or lashing out at humans in defense of their families and their environment. In fact, since human equipment has been responsible for severe damage to the environment, it should come as no surprise that Gnomes are not fond of modern technology at all!

Though it has been said that Gnomes are attracted to humans who appreciate and aid animals, or who have respect and appreciation for the Earth, Ted Andrews, author of Enchantment Of The Faerie Realm, believes each of us has a ‘personal Gnome’ to guide us through our lives.

Much like the idea of guardian angels, Ted Andrews promotes the theory that humans are each assigned four Elemental beings of the Faerie Realm. Sylphs are the Air Faeries who guide us in thought, inspiration, scent and sound. Undines are the Water Faeries who assist us with emotion, planning, and our spiritual being. Salamanders are the Fire Faeries, fueling our passions and guiding us through transformation, as well as prompting us into action. To guide our physical well being, our health, and our ability to sustain physical form on this planet, we have been blessed with the Gnome.

According to Andrews, too little connection with our personal Gnomes could lead to ill health, flighty existence, and a lack of ability to remain grounded. A lacking relationship with a guardian Gnome may result in a person’s negligence of their body’s basic needs, such as proper diet, exercise, or getting enough rest. On the contrary, too much contact with our personal Gnomes may lead to stunned creativity, skepticism, cynicism, narrow mindedness, and a lack of imagination.

In his book entitled Good Faeries/Bad Faeries, author Brain Froud states: “Gnomes live in the ground and are famous for their stubbornness and their wisdom. Gnomes are practical, down-to-Earth, deeply rooted in reality, and disapprove of anything airy-fairy. Unfortunately, a Gnome is also prone to being a stick-in-the-mud and can get bogged down with inertia. The thoughts of the Gnome tend to be very precise…but also very slow. A sentence might take a whole year to speak (or in the case of certain Gnomes, an entire century). Gnome jokes are not very funny because they never get to the punch line.”

Many people regard Gnomes as fictional characters spawning from a world of imagination and make believe. But there are those who choose to believe that Gnomes, in addition to other Faerie Folk, are real – existing in other dimensions, beyond the veil of human perception, on the astral plane. For those who believe, it’s possible to build lasting and working relationships with these enchanting creatures. Because Gnomes are benevolent beings who are wise and kind in their essence, all that’s required to draw them to you is a pure heart, an open mind, and a simple invitation. “Cead mile failte” say the Gnomes: “A hundred – thousand welcomes.”

Those who believe in Faeries and magick often choose to work with Gnomes, making use of Gnome magick through music and dance to raise energy, for healing, divining the future, and in appreciation and protection of Earth and it’s plentiful resources. In ceremonial magick, where the Four Directions are honored and called forth, it is the Gnome who answers the call, representing the North. Gnomes have been called upon to aid wounded animals, to assist ailing humans, to uncover the riches of the Earth, and to share their timeless wisdom in spiritual guidance. Gnomes are willing to share their knowledge of herbs, minerals, crystals, and other natural resources of our planet – if we’re willing to listen.

There’s more to the Gnomes than being a lawn ornament. Though much of what we know about Gnomes comes from European legend and lore, the stories being passed down through the ages, permeating myriad cultures world-wide maybe much more than simple fairy tales. There’s magick in the air for those who choose to know the Gnomes.

Do you believe?

Sources:

Title: A Witch’s Guide to Faery Folk
Author: Edain McCoy
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
Pub. Date: March 1994
ISBN-13: 9780875427331
384pp

Title: Enchantment of the Faerie Realm
Author: Ted Andrews
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.
Pub. Date: April 1993
ISBN-13: 9780875420028
240pp

Title: Good Faeries, Bad Faeries
Author: Brian Froud
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: October 1998
ISBN-13: 9780684847818
192pp

Title: The Ancient Art of Faery Magick
Author: D.J. Conway
Publisher: Crossing Press, Inc., The
Pub. Date: September 2005
ISBN-13: 9781580911573
226pp

Title: The Great Encyclopedia of Faeries
Author: Pierre Dubois
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: April 2000
ISBN-13: 9780684869575
184pp

Title: The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Faeries
Author: Anna Franklin
Publisher: Paper Tiger
Pub. Date: June 2005
ISBN-13: 9781843402404
288pp

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Written by:
Wendi Friend

Faerie fantasies, elf encounters, gnome sightings, pixie dust, enchanted realms… we’ve all tickled our minds and dazzled our imaginations with the tales of magic and mayhem. But are they real? Do they exist, and if so, how can we see them? Where did they come from? If they’re real, why are they shrouded in doubt and disbelief? Does wanting to believe in faeries mean you’re delusional?

Stories and beliefs about the history, legend, and lore of faeries are as varied as a Las Vegas Buffet line! Peppered with curious riddles and rhymes, salted with cynicism and skepticism, spiced with vivid details that lead to renewed hope and wonder, the seasons of faeries are many. Though never scientifically proven or captured for display, and though varied in size, shape, color, origin, purpose, and other factors including diversified spellings of the word faerie itself, one thing is fact: Seasoned stories of faeries have appeared in every culture, in every era, in every part of the world throughout human history. In that sense, faeries are very real.

The spellings of the word faerie are as flavorful as the varieties of faeries themselves. You’ll find it spelled faerie, faery, fairie, fairy, fay, fey, and then some. You’ll also hear them referred to as the wee ones, the wee folk, the little folk, the little people, and more. There really is no right or wrong way to spell or define faeries. Much like religion, the relationships one has with faeries is based on personal spiritual connection and personal definition or preference. In fact, in some cultures, belief in faeries is so strong that it is a religion in and of itself, The Faerie Faith. Other religions, such as druidism and paganism, incorporate faerie beliefs into their faiths as well. This certainly adds to the spice rack of faerie flavor! Whether you’re just a fan of Walt Disney’s Tinkerbelle, or your belief is so strong it ranks as worship, there’s a way for you to believe in faeries.

The druid faith is said to believe that when a human dies, they’re reborn or reincarnated into the enchanted realm known as faeryland, another word with diversified spellings and aliases. In the druid version of faeryland, all faeries are born as adults and there are no faerie children. In that same belief system, when a faerie dies, they are born into the human world, the earthly plane, as mortals. Thus, according to druid faerie faith, death is the gateway to immortality, and the portal between the human and faerie realms. However, the religion of Wicca has another view.

According to the concepts of Wicca, faeries were a creation of the deities, the gods and goddesses, just as humans and animals were created. In the faith of Wicca, the plane (or frequency) on which faeries vibrate is known as the astral plane, a place experienced by the psychic eye (or Third Eye) and spirit, not by mortal eyesight. Wicca faith is said to teach that in the long ago past, humans and faeries worked quite closely with one another, often even forming friendships, relationships, and producing offspring. As the stories go, humans began mistreating the faeries, taking advantage of their gifts, and causing rifts in human/faerie relationships. Eventually, the two forms of life were no longer able to peacefully co-exist, and so the veil between the worlds was drawn closed, to be opened only by those with the utmost belief and respect for the faerie kingdom, the astral plane, and for magic. But you don’t have to be part of a religion or “movement” in order to experience faerie enchantments. All you have to do is open your mind to the possibilities, and the possibilities are many!

In the faerie kingdom, according to no-one specific faith yet supported by many, is the concept of a hierarchy system. Humans tend to group anything immortal or with wings attached into one category called “Angels and Faeries”. The truth is, there are as many varieties of enchanted creatures as there are animals on earth! To group them all into one general human-tainted stereotype is unfair. Most who take the faeries and other “fantastical” creatures seriously respect the fact that these life forms bring to the table a wide variety of seasons and spices in the ways of gifts, talents, offerings, purposes, and human encounters. Among these diversified entities is a hierarchal system.

To be considered when speaking of the faerie realm, faerie kingdom, or faeryland are Elementals, which are a higher concentrated energy and more deity like than human; Nature Spirits, which govern the seasons and the environment; Elemental Faeries, which are the Sylphs (Air faeries), Undines (Water Faeries), Gnomes (Earth faeries), and Salamanders (Fire faeries). The Elementals, also known as Devas and closest to deity in likeness, are the highest rank in the faerie kingdom. Though they are divided by elemental properties (air/earth/water/fire), the directions (North, South, East, and West), and the Seasons (Summer, Autumn, Winter, and Spring), they are united in their purpose, power, and processes. When it comes to “seeing” faeries, it’s unlikely for an elemental or deva to be spotted. Instead, they’re felt, absorbed like a sponge, permeating the being and causing goose bumps.

After devas and elementals, we must return to the Sylphs, Undines, Salamanders, and Gnomes. Each of these names is general, and each has a wide variety of faeries, pixies, trolls, and other creatures under its description. However, each of the four groups has a King and a Queen, and so those kings and queens follow devas in the hierarchy of faeryland. Another thing to be considered is that each of these groups of creatures has its own “prime time”, its own season in which its energies are strongest, it’s most apt to be experienced, and its potential is highest. All of the creatures in faeryland exist all year round, but they take turns in regard to who amongst them is strongest in power throughout the year. It’s a cycle, much like the wheel of the year.

So if there are levels and tiers of faeries, diversified concepts through time and history of faerie origins and ways, and nearly every culture in all human history has some version of faerie lore, what are the chances that you have been in the presence of a faerie in your lifetime? Granted, there are common tales like the tooth faerie and we’ve all seen a Tinkerbelle character or two, as well as artwork, collectibles, tee shirts, and other faerie kissed merchandise. But I mean what are the chances that you have been near enough to have seen a faerie… if you knew what you were looking for?

Jack frost, frost faeries, snow faeries, the Snow Queen, the Frost King, Old Man Winter… these are all varying types of faeries that are associated with winter. Has Jack Frost ever nipped you on the nose? The snow faeries are most active in late autumn to early spring, and have nocturnal tendencies. These faeries are responsible for the delivery of winter as they breathe frost onto windows and sprinkle snow.

What about the Green Man, Jack in the Green, or the persona of Robin Hood? Are you familiar with those? How about Mother Nature, Father Time, tree spirits, or flower faeries? Every single plant, flower, and tree is manned by a faerie. Spring faeries bring forth new life; they encourage the blossoming of flowers, the colors and textures in fields, crops, meadows, and forests. They are responsible for everything alive and growing, all the way down to the shape, size, color, and feel of a single blade of grass. Surely you’ve come close enough to have seen one of those… if you’d have known what to look for, that is.

Salamanders are fire faeries, and there’s a salamander in every single flame ever sparked, from campfires to candles to cigarette lighters. When the great ball of fire shines hottest and brightest in the sky, there’s a salamander nearby.

There are many spices and seasons of faeries, but there are also faeries for every season, and varying stories of which faeries go with which seasons, depending on the source. Learning about the types of faeries, their legend and lore, likes and dislikes, peak and off-times, origins, customs, and what their gifts are can increase your chances of seeing faeries, and can also bring you closer to being able to work with them on a mutually beneficial basis.

Do you believe?

Sources Used:

Books:

Title: Moon Magick
Author: D.J. Conway
ISBN: 1567181678
Format: Paperback, 320pp
Pub. Date: July 1995
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.

Title: Faery Folk
Author: Edain McCoy
ISBN: 0875427332
Format: Paperback, 384pp
Pub. Date: April 1994
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.

Title: Enchantment of the Faerie Realm
Author: Ted Andrews
ISBN: 0875420028
Format: Paperback, 216pp
Pub. Date: April 1993
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, Ltd.

Website:

http://www.angelfire.com/weird/alternativenet/anetdru1.html

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Written by:
Wendi Friend

Who among us hasn’t mentally entertained glamorous tales of fantasy? Most of us have daydreamed at least once or twice about alternate realities, other dimensions, dragons, wizards, and faeries. What would it be like if we really did have an Alice in Wonderland experience in which we were suddenly transported into a world of mystery, magick, and mayhem?

Think about it. If you were going to travel to a foreign country, you’d probably see to a multitude of arrangements in advance, including but not limited to: exchange in currency, language barriers, customs, laws, moral codes, social standards and class. You might investigate crime areas or safety measures. But would you be prepared in the least if you really did have a chance to join a magickal tea party with faerie folk and bewitching beings? Would you know how to communicate, how to find your way around, how to properly compensate and show respect for the land you’re visiting – or would you know how to protect and defend yourself against magickally equipped thugs and bullies?

Yes, thugs and bullies exist even in realms as enchanted as the faerie kingdom – so do laws, consequences, customs, and challenges. When traveling to faerie land, on purpose or by accident, one must be prepared for the wide array of diversified faerie characters, as well as the characteristics of humans that are liked and disliked by the faerie folk.

Many people tend to group all faeries together into one visual image – a thumb-sized, winged, glittery creature with undefined magickal abilities. This, however, is not at all the case. Faeries are incredibly diversified not only in location, appearance, size, and shape, but in likes, dislikes, morals, values, goals, sects, and then some. To assume that all faeries are the likes of Tinkerbelle or Thumbelina is a mistake.

Those of the faerie kingdom do have certain elements in common with one another. For example, nearly all faeries prefer to remain invisible and will take insult to being acknowledged directly. Likewise, if a faerie assists a human in any way, it is considered rude for the human to directly offer thanks. Instead, a subtle gift left out where it can be found, unlabeled, is most appropriate.

Those of the faerie kingdom are incredibly sensitive and quite easily offended. There are many stories, tales, and legends of faerie pranks, kidnappings, souring of milk, breaking household appliances, and other malicious (though rarely truly harmful) events resulting from a faerie’s feelings being hurt. Whether or not these stories are true, no one can actually say, but caution combined with ultimate respect is highly suggested when dealing with any faerie characters.

Each variety of faerie has its own traits, quarks, general attributes, gifts, features, and functions. Faerie functions range everywhere from aiding Mother Nature, Father Time, and the Four Directions in the basic functions of life, such as nurturing or adding colors and aroma to flowers or decorating a sunset, to being assigned to humans to aid with basic elemental functions, like dealing with emotions, physical health, inspiration, etc. There are faeries assigned to every element, every direction, every plant, flower, and blade of grass, and there are said to be faeries assigned to every single person.

Rumor has it that certain faerie characters are mischievous and love nothing more than pulling pranks on innocent humans. Based on legend, there may be some truth in that statement, although the statement cannot be considered entirely true. Lore leads us to believe that at one time, faeries and humans may have well worked together, sharing many of life’s pleasures and chores. In time, however, mankind began taking advantage of the faerie folks, manipulating them, trying to trick them, and being greedy with faerie magick. Because of this, many faeries retreated all together, disappearing from Earth.

Other faeries became angry at the disregard humanity had shown for Nature, the Elements, and for Life, and therefore moved forward with grudges, taking pleasure in “punishing” humans for their treatment of life’s gifts. In general, and with good reason, it is said that faeries have a great distrust in humans, and no respect to speak of for humankind. There are, however, exceptions to every rule. While some faeries vanished and others rebelled, still more found ways to remain, to blend in, or to hide in their surroundings. Aside from these, there are those faeries who are fascinated with and curious about humans or human behavior, much like some humans are fascinated with faeries and faerie behavior.

In the land of faerie, things operate on a hierarchy system. There are Devas who can be considered closer to deity than to faerie, there are Sylphs, Undines, Gnomes, and Salamanders who work with the elements. There are trooping faeries, which are the royal state of the faerie kingdom, and there are also peasant faeries, outcast faeries, rebel faeries, and a whole slew of others, such as pixies, brownies, leprechauns, giants, mermaids, mermen, and hundreds more. Each has his own talent, his own treasure, and his own secrets.

Never make a deal with a faerie, even if they’re of the most generous, kind nature. Negotiations with faeries never work to the advantage of humans. When in faerie land, never accept a gift from anyone; any gift is always expected to be repaid in a fashion we can’t possibly imagine or enjoy. There are rumors that faeries will often extend hospitality and graciousness to humans, particularly on equinoxes and solstices. However, it is also said that a human who eats, drinks, and dances with the faeries loses all track of time, remaining trapped for eternity in an unfulfilling illusion of glamour magick.

Faeries – all faeries – are adept to some level with shape shifting or glamour spells. Their magick allows them to be seen, or not to be seen, or can cause a human to see things that aren’t really there, or be blinded to things that are right in front of their own nose. That being the case, one must rely 100% on instinct and intuition, forsaking the five senses we’re accustomed to as humans.

Considering the risks of “believing” in faeries, for what it means in regard to societal rejection or mental instability, there are those humans who continue to believe in the faerie kingdom – some to the point of worship and religion. For those, it is entirely possible to form working relationships with certain elementals and entities from the enchanted realm. There are many ways that faeries and humans can work together for mutual benefit. These faerie-loving humans will try anything to see a faerie, including spells, charms, or special stones, herbs, or flowers for attracting faeries. However, there are certain types of faerie characters every human being should avoid. You can even view a list of the Otherworld’s Top Ten Most Wanted enchanted faerie characters. (link provided)

Daydreaming of faeries can be a delightful way to pass time, and believing in faeries can be a wonderful way of life. Working with faeries can be ultimately beneficial and enlightening, but one must always keep an intuitive eye out for those not so pleasant enchanted faerie characters.

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